Joshua Tree, Jaliscan and Italian

Today we decided to let the wind take us. We doodled around the main drag checking out little shops and were frankly kinda bored. So we hoped in the car and headed to 29 Palms. Mostly so Rob could take a photo for some ex-band mates, referencing the Robert Plant song. The drive is very picturesque and enjoyable. The mountains, as all mountains are, are mesmerizing. We pass wind farms and desert scrub while our front vista is the gorgeous Sierra Nevadas. As we ride higher in elevation and the scene changes little, but the mountains envelope you.

On the return from 29 Palms, which aside from the pretty desert drive is nothing to right home about, we decided to check out Joushua Tree National Park. $20 gets you a 7 day pass. The road into the park leads us past humble desert abodes and a few upscale but not over the top, colourful homes built into the landscape. The builders seem to know what they have and use it to the best of their means.

Joshua is a pristine National Park at the center of two deserts, the Mohave and the Colorado. It is a chilly 58 degrees once you leave the valley. The only trees above the scrub are the pointy, prickly poodle tufts of the Joshua. They dot the landscape and oversee the lesser vegetation and small cacti.

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It is January and the desert is awaiting its spring burst to life, but there is plenty to see.  Deserts, despite their name, are teeming with life, insects, birds wheeling overhead, small and medium sized mammals and lizards and reptiles skittering across roadways and under bushes. The stone hills, the only relief taller than the Joshuas,  look carefully stacked and like they could tumble at any moment, but in reality they have been formed by millions of years of volcanic activity and weathered by wind and water.

IMG_4185On the return trip we intend to check out a little BBQ place we saw on the way in, but alas it is closed until Super Bowl Sunday. Decision made. Tacos at the scrabbled together Jaliscan Mexican joint attached to the Jaliscan tire mart.

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They don’t speak English and we muddle through ordering. How can you go wrong? You can’t really. One look and you know it is authentic Mexican and you will leave with happy mouth.

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We ordered up 3 kinds of soft tacos, pork carnitas, al pastor and carne asada with two Modela beers.  The tacos, $1.50 each, came on two 3 inch soft, corn tacos with a little raw, sweet onion and a choice of red or green salsa. Total for 6 tacos and two beers, $13.30. Perfect.

Back at the inn we chill around the pool as the sun sinks behind Mount St. Jacinto, with icy drinks and catch up on the day. Tonight we we will walk across the street to dine at Appetito, for some light Italian fare.

It is a short, pleasant walk to Appetito in the chill desert evening air. The place is half full on this Tuesday evening and we grab what ever table we want. We order a nice bottle of chianti and consider the menu.

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Clam linguine for me and spaghetti with Sunday sauce for the man. The linguine was classic, garlic and white wine with perfectly cooked pasta.

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Rob’s Sunday sauce was a nice sweet tomato and the pork sausage was tight with  sweet Italian spices and a lot of fennel. We were offered regular or large portions which was really appreciated.

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The regular size was perfect and allowed us a little room to share a dessert of Kahlua bread pudding.  Cappuccinos arrive (average) and a piece of excellent, caramelly coffee bread pudding that could easily feed six.

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While very good, I am not sure of the point of this. It was far to large a portion for two of us let alone the single it was intended for.

Back to the hotel for a little reading and a little research for what to do tomorrow.

Palm Springs Winter 2016!

We booked this winter escape months ago, before the epic loonie slide and before we realized that winter in BC is completely doable and actually enjoyable despite the claims of friends weakened by years of not living through snowpocalypses and snot freezers.

Our flight to the desert is at a civilized time, 11:10. What is not civilized is an hour drive to the airport. Very spoiled by the 20 minute drive to Ottawa International.

Josie, the spoiler, had us up at 4 am puking in our bed and then insisting on sleeping at the top of the bed between the two of us. Sigh.  I have had less demanding two year olds. Oh well. Up to walk her in 5 degrees under blue skies. Spring has begun in Fort Langley and the chickadees, redwinged blackbirds, crows, towhees and a host of other tree dwellers are singing to each other. I’m looking forward to the desert but I am thrilled that my new life in winter includes pretty frosts, blooms and colourful berries, songbirds and best of all, no potholes and no disgusting spring melt. The only downside to this trip is — we gonna get hosed by the loonie. Oh well, can’t think about it. It is what it is.

First time flying Air Canada Rouge. More casual intimate cabin service. Pilot comes on several times to point out landscape features, Mount St. Helens, Lake Tahoe.

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On approach we see the pastel Sierra Nevadas, desert sands, towering Royal palms and Joshua trees.  Sunny, 23, with a light breeze…aaahhhhhh.

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The Palm Springs airport is not very large. Luggage is quickly gathered and we are in our rental pretty quick. We are booked in at the Ace where we have stayed once before.  After settling in we walk down to the Amigo Room for a cocktail and nosh, hoping to see our former skateboarding bartender. He has moved on unsurprisingly. Cool, storied dudes like him don’t stay in one place too long, I’m thinking. Or the Johnnie Law catches up.

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New guy at the bar is engaging and likes to talk bourbon. Seattle transplant and Sharks fan brings us some powerful cocktails and a queso with a nice zingy heat as well as a dish of roasted shishito peppers tossed smoked chili salt, lime and cilantro.

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Perfect pause in a jet setting day.

 

IMG_4492Tonight we are staying close to home and dining at The King’s Highway here at Ace.

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The resto is crowded in anticipation of Monday night bingo with Bella DeBall. Bella is striking, at least 6 feet 5 inches, not including Barbie pink shoes and bouffant hair.

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We order a pint of Oskar Blues Brewery Momma’s Little Yella Pils, a very tasty pilsner and a local pear cider. For an appy we shared the house made ricotta with figs, thyme, honey and rustic fruit nut toast. The toast was nicely grilled with a little char. The cheese was creamy and mild. Delicious but a little heavy handed with the serving.

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For mains we both ordered the Jidori  Buttermilk Fried Chicken (4 pieces) with Habanero Honey. Jidori is a domestic breed of free range chicken known for its robust flavour.

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The crunchy crisp chicken with a sweet heat bite was very tender and juicy and accompanied by celery root mashed potatoes and preserved lemon butter. Nothing but cream, butter and air. Excellent. A watercress salad, lightly dressed, with a very well made quick pickle of thinly shaved onion rounded out the meal.

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We stayed for a couple of rounds of bingo, intended to slip next door to the Amigo Room for Trivia night but, alas, waking up to a barfing dog at 4AM caught up to us. Chilling in the room and planning tomorrow.

South of France River Cruise Wrap-up

The Viking Cruise Ship Experience

The Ship

This ship was made in 2012 as with the entire fleet, so it’s new, modern and has the very latest in amenities, including satellite wi-fi (although it’s not screamingly fast).

You will pay for drinks in the lounge but you can purchase a premium drinks package separately. Depends on how much you drink. This is not an all-inclusive get hammered on cheap alcohol kind of cruise. Bartenders are experienced and know how to make a decent cocktail. There is unlimited wine and beer with meals.

IMG_9124There are only about 160 passengers  and amenities are very close by. It’s way more intimate than the floating cities that are today’s ocean liners. Cabins are never more than a two minute walk to dining areas and outdoor decks, quiet spaces and computer centers. We did not have to call down for this or that  except extra pillows, which came in mere minutes.

Vienne 005People have asked what the ship looks like. The answer? Exactly as pictured on the website and in print and television medias. There’s no real-life step down. It’s gorgeous.

The Cabin

Our cabin was a first class cabin and is generally the one pictured on TV. It was spacious and very well appointed. Having the balcony off the cabin for private outside time was  very nice, but there are plenty of areas to be outside if you don’t have a balcony. Showers and toilets worked beautifully. We heard from other passengers that their cabins were less spacious but also much cheaper. Best to check online for your own needs. It was really nice not to be tripping over each other. The room came with a bottle of sparkling wine which we sipped on our balcony on a hot day between ports. Nice.

Having BOTH 110V and 220V outlets in each cabin, as well as USB charging ports were thoughtful additions.

The Staff

We’ve been on other cruises. Service was always professional and fastidious.

We were very impressed by the staff’s interactions with passengers and their overall demeanor. They were comfortably engaging and gregarious, and while professional, they were not formal. Clearly designed to be a Viking differentiator.

Midway through the cruise we were required to change ships due to the fact that our cruise began on the wrong ship because of high waters. It was utterly painless. The team added extra perks: a cheese tasting and a bottle of local wine, for example. When we got back aboard, wet and cold from Lyon, they had prepared some rum-laced hot chocolate for us. It seemed like it was just for us — they were thoughtful and attentive and made it seem like OUR cruise was the only cruise.

A special note: our cruise director, Nikolas, an American-raised Belgian, was everybody’s friend – knowledgeable, friendly, funny and professional. He gave personal recommendations to anyone who asked and also gave daily briefings to all passengers, as well as presentations on wine, art and cheese that were informative, well-researched but never too academic.

The Food

The food on board was pretty much perfect for a large and varied group of passengers. The chefs managed to feed everyone with a fairly varied menu that highlighted the region’s cuisine. Of course the food in southern France is generally more rustic and passengers  expect some fancier fare so, while this is not a complaint in any sense, we found in many cases, the chefs’ hands were tied and probably they focused on presentation and mass appeal in their versions of the local dishes.

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Our best meals were rustic and full of local flavour. We ate lunch at a sidewalk café in Avignon and sit rose wine while eating fois gras, roast duck and other local delicacies. And on the ship , the chef surprised us this one day with a special menu featuring the rustic cuisine of Provence: Baguette, olives, local dried sausage, herb roasted chicken and duck and local cheeses. It was the best meal of the trip by far.

Vienne 008Vienne 007Tour Guides

All of our tour guides were exemplary. They were excellent guides that knew their subjects — history, architecture and culture. They also knew so much more, including about the geography and the horticulture or the region. They did a superb job of wrangling large groups of tourists  while never seeming to rush or to corral.

Viking employs QuietVox, the latest in guided tour technology. It’s a small receiver that every tourist wore which was tuned automatically to the tour guides’ transmitter. The perfect tour experience. Guides could speak quietly and respect residential areas and hallowed places while including everyone. We could go further afield of the group and still hear the guide clearly which was especially good for discovering photo opportunities.

Travel

This, being our first Viking river cruise, we chose to go top-drawer all the way, which included first-class air travel to Europe and back which ain’t cheap. They were long travel days but at least we had short lines and more comfortable surroundings.

It was a pricey trip, but if you wanted to not spend so much, regular economy airfare and a smaller cabin would still make for a great vacation. There’s lots of hang-out space on the ship, so not a big need for a larger cabin.

Something that never occurred to us — Spring rains make the rivers high, which can hamper river navigation for ships on rivers that include ancient bridges.

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The crew wasn’t sure that the cruise would make it all the way to Lyon and Chalon-Sur-Saône because of the combination of high waters and particularly low bridges there. As it turned out, we were able to make all of our stops but on a couple occasions we were awakened in the morning  by the crew dismantling all of the structures on the sun deck above us to make under-bridge passage possible.

The Places

The Stops

The stops along the cruise were amazing choices — each was unique and different from the last. We wish had more time in each but had to keep moving. But, then we look back at what we packed into 8 days, we realize the ground we covered. As with many cruises, we discover the locations we will return to on our own (*cough, cough* Beaune.)

Arles

Arles was our first stop — a wonderful representative of the colours of Provence – the blues, the yellows. We walked in ancient footsteps among  Roman ruins and saw the inspiration for many of Vincent Van Gogh’s most famous works. We took in the wandering ancient streets to the Roman coliseum and the Amphitheater from the first century, built by Augustus in Julius Caesar’s honour. As, well we stopped by the locations made immortal by Van Gogh’s most famous paintings, Starry Night, Cafe at Night.

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Avignon

We walked through the narrow streets where Avignon has it’s own  Roman ruins and then the remnants of Roman influence from 1000 years later when Avignon held the seat of the Catholic Church during war. For me, the highlight was a stop at Les Halles at Avignon, a market for purveyors, of cheeses, meats and pastries. We saw lovely sausages, pates, breads and everything for an amazing Provencal repast.

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Leaving our guided tour at this point, we scouted out a French sidewalk cafe from which to  soak in the sun the proper way. A lovely lunch, some rose wine and lovely conversation made for a lifetime memory.

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Leaving Avignon we began the most picturesque part of the river cruise, passing limestone mountains, vineyards and castles, drinking sparkling wine on our sunny balcony.

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Our trip through Vienne revealed a stunning view of the city from the church atop a mountain.

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Then the most unexpected thing happened. To show us the quality of the acoustics of the church, our tour guide sang Ave Maria in a pitch perfect, strong and clear voice that transported everyone in the room. It was one of the highlights of our entire trip.

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Again Vienne had it’s own Roman ruins, most impressively, the temple of Augustus and Livia.

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Ardeche/Tournon

At our next stop, Ardeche we boarded a steam train, enjoyed a ride through the country side (don’t wear white. It is a dirty ride) and sampled some of the ciders and juices made from the area’s fruits.

Ardeche 006The train wound around the mountains of the region and gave us views of rivers and gorges and the odd nudist who, I’m sure, figured they’d be totally alone and didn’t count on a train full of tourists going by 100 metres above.

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Lyon

Lyon is a large city and we had really only a few hours to spend there. We toured the very old streets and the “traboules” – passageways through the buildings from street to street as old Lyon didn’t have enough room between mountain and river for cross streets everywhere.

Lyon 008We were in search of Lyonnaise sausages and nougat, specialties of the area. We found each of them in quaint shops that sold them and other specialties of the area. It was a cold, blustery day in Lyon, but shopping along its narrow, old streets was fantastic.

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Chalon-sur-Saône/Beaune

It’s like the trip saved the best for last. We pulled into a more industrial part of Chalon-sur-Saone because the water was too high to pass under the ancient bridge to downtown proper. It was fine, because were were taking the bus to Beaune in Burgundy, wine capital of France, and maybe all the world.

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It had warmed up, the sun was out and we enjoyed our trip through the clos, the stone-walled vineyards of Burgundy, past the mustard factory into Beaune. We walked through the Hôtel Dieu and had our wine tasting in an old cellar.

Beaune 017We poked about for a short time and then had to leave for our last night on the boat. We will definitely be coming back to Beaune, maybe someday, to stay. We liked it that much.
Beaune 024You see the Viking ads on television and the web. As with most things, you don’t believe the real thing can measure up to the idealized version presented there. This is an exception. Seeing the advertising after we’ve returned, our reaction was the same: it’s JUST like that. 100% just like that. It was a spectacular introduction to the South of France. Intimate. Romantic. Historic. Wonderful.

Final Day Cruising & Beaune

Somewhere this morning we left a pile of passengers on shore for a wine excursion. They will meet us by bus further down the river. The boat casts off and continues on down to Chalon-sur-Saône. We elect to sleep in and do the afternoon excursion as we have a hellish travel schedule tomorrow. There will be no sleep tonight as the load-out starts at 2:00 in the morning.

Our last day will be in beautiful Beaune, in Burgundy. Beaune, of course, is well known for world class winemaking and also for mustard. Today our tour will take us into the heart of this region, through a town called Meursault and into Beaune. We will visit an ancient winery and and the Hôtel Dieu as well as enjoy a bit of free time to shop.

Beaune 015We board the motorcoach for a four hour tour. We pass many fields of grains growing and eventually those fields give way to vineyards. Meursault is on a hill and all we climb we pass beautiful walled stone houses or clos.

Beaune 016Beaune is not a region of chateaus like the Beaujolais region. The clos have modest sized homes with walled gardens and deep scarlet roses climbing the walls.Now and then you get a peek through a break or arch in a wall down to the muted, sun drenched vines in their neat rows.   Breathtaking. I’m dying to stop for photos but there is no time if we are to make the tasting.

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We continue on and disembark near the town centre across from the Hotel Dieu from 1443. This incredible building was donated by a couple of wealthy patrons, as a place to care for the sick poor. Not much more than a comfortable bed, soup, and medicinal herbs were available to pretty much ease you into death.

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Stained glass over the altar explained in pictorial detail what your fate would be if you did not accept Jesus. Very soothing. The hospital has been  preserved as a museum and is quite remarkable especially in light of the fact that this was the only working hospital in Beaune until 1971.

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Also at the Hôtel Dieu was The Last Judgement, it’s original polyptych altarpiece by the Flemish artist Rogier van der Weyden — A piece that figures prominently in the region, and also in a search and rescue mission from WWII that saw it rescued from destruction, featured in the 2012 film, Monument Men.

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Next we continue on to a famous cellar to taste three wines. The beautiful stone cellar itself, musty and with low ceilings, represents some of the finest product of the region.

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We taste two excellent whites, one a premier cru, a 6-year-old Pinot which they urge you to age another 14 or more years (ha!), and another specialty of the region, cassis liqueur. Of course we buy all of them.

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After the tasting we have a bit of time to pop into shops. There are a few bakeries, linen shops and souvenir shops. No time to explore this gorgeous town further unfortunately. We are due back at the bus for a return to the ship and dinner.

 

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Dinner tonight begins with a rather horrible piece of sushi for an amuse bouche. Soggy, tasteless and definitely the only bad thing we have eaten on the cruise. It was a surprise as it did not even suit the theme of the meal. It was quickly forgotten over another quite excellent and rustic meal following it.

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Chicken cassoulet appetizer with puff pastry and lots of tarragon and a deep, rich Boeuf Bourguignon with buttered noodles for a main. Both are delicious and exactly the kind of rustic food we are looking for on the cruise, the kind of food that makes me want to get home and prepare some French meals. Inspiring.

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Since we have changed ships and chefs, we have noted a more rustic trend that is our personal preference. Not to say the food on the Buri was not excellent. It was, it was just a little too “fancy” for a cruise in Provence for our tastes and I have to believe as I said in an earlier post that the food was pleasing to 98% of the cruisers. And once again I have to restate that it is no reflection on Viking, it is only personal preference.

After dinner we have to pack and go to bed for our 2 am wake up call and a 24 hour return home to Ottawa. Back to real life.

Un Petit Goût de Lyon and on to Beaune

We awake to an 8 degree Lyon which promises to rain on us. We are busing into the town center to see a basillica and then into old town to shop. Upon our return to the ship we depart for Beaune on the Saone (rhymes with Rhone) River.

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A note about cruising with Viking and their shore excursion guides. We have now been on several tours this trip and have to give kudos to Viking. Their guides are some of the best we have ever encountered. Each one has been extremely knowledgeable about the town and the history of the area and knowledgeable beyond their talks. As well, each one has implemented their own personal style and delivery. Our guide into Lyon, Christian, is well-traveled and a comedian. It was a highly entertaining morning. Beyond that, we have taken as we said, several of the leisurely tours. In each case the guide was superb at keeping the tour moving but never making the more infirm passengers feel hurried. Lastly, unlike in North American tours, tipping while gladly accepted, is never mentioned, either by the guide or by putting a visible basket up front labeled “Tips”. A euro or two for your driver and a little more for your guide is appreciated and well deserved. Our guides this cruise have truly taken our experience to above and beyond.

On this blustery day, our second last of this trip, we view a good part of the city of Lyon from the shores of the Saone River and the hill above the city upon which the Notre Dame de Fourvière Basilica is perched.  Colourful buildings line the shores of the river and I notice each window is decorated with an ornate iron faux balcony and window valance. Very picturesque. Our bus climbs the hill to the basilica to where we are let out to view the building. Here we are invited into the most ornate building, church or otherwise, I have ever entered. A sight to behold – a wedding cake topped with ice cream and sprinkles then dusted in gold leaf for good measure. A cherry would be gauche.

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After viewing the spectacular interior we head to the the walled cliff just beyond to see the equally spectacular view of the city of Lyon at our feet.

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The bus winds its way down the hillside and deposits us in old town. Our guide, Christian, leads us through traboules, ancient doors in the apartment walls that lead to interior courtyards and serve as shortcuts between the streets. The traboules are distinct to Lyon.

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In the ancient town of narrow cobbled streets we peruse shops and cafes. There are many purveyors of candy – chocolate, calisson and nougat –  specialties of the region, flower shops, soap and gourmet foods such as regional salts, meats and candied fruit.

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We are on the hunt for regional specialties, particularly Lyonaise sausages. We are stymied on many occasions because the French feel Wednesday is a holiday especially preceding a bank holiday which is then followed by a what the hell holiday, because you know…we are, French. So. Not a lot open the past few days. Luckily, we stumble upon a lovely shop here in this narrow alley in Lyon which features an array of homemade sausages: fine herb, blueberry, paprika, boar, chevre, poivre, nature — handmade and rustic. We select several and are dying to get them home to share with friends. Some baguette, french cheese, moutard and a pickle. Happiness.

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Our time, while short but well spent and very enjoyable,  is cut even shorter as the skies open and heavy rain chases us back to the bus and onward to our waiting ship. We are treated to hot chocolate spiked with rum upon boarding, to chase the chill. The Viking staff often have little surprises waiting.

This evening the crew present a farewell dinner to us. The day after tomorrow, most passengers have horrific flight schedules, us included, so tonight will be the night for goodbyes. Dinner, a seven course event, includes regional specialties from the Burgundy region where we are now docked, including escargot, filet mignon and shrimp with bearnaise and duchesse potatoes with red wine jus and crepe Suzette for dessert. Lovely end to a lovely week.

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Tomorrow we have a walking tour of Chalon-sur-Saone and some free time to shop before an early dinner and early up for a brutally early flight.