Tag Archives: Local food

Locavore Artisan Food Fair

On a sunny, but chilly December morning Maureen and I headed to the Locavore Artisan Food Market at Memorial Hall in New Edinburgh. Located in a tiny community centre, the room was brimming with local food vendors and patrons, all there to celebrate our local food business and the local food movement.

The room was small, but it was packed!

Cookies, salsas, ice creams, breads, spreads, mustards, sauces, jams, pies, spices, cakes, full meals and many other items were being sold at a brisk pace. By the time you read this, the event will be over, of course. However the vendors make their products available via many outlets in the city and sometimes directly. It really is worth seeking out these artisans and supporting their businesses. It helps to diversify the Ottawa palate, grow the local economy, bring together the Ottawa food community, and it’s damn tasty too. These items make terrific presents and also make form a more interesting table at home.

Jams from michaelsdolce
Pie and ready-made mincemeat from Life of Pie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Art-is-in Bakery wares. Hard to not want to buy everything!

We picked up more of Pascal’es amazing hot chocolate (and I hope to actually have some this time), some “Hot Toddy” ice cream, some michaelsdolce jams, Mrs. McGarrigle’s mustards, Yummy Cookies chocolate-dipped shortbread cookies and some smoked tomato jam from Just Wing’it. Yum!

Some yummy cookies from...well, Yummy Cookies.

Here’s a listing of all the local artisans with links to their websites. Please support them!

Everything looked so good.
Goodies galore.

Local Chicken Gets Beer Canned

Maureen:
In our quest to eat more local produce when possible, I discovered that Scott, one of the guys I play hockey with has a small operation, Winfield’s Farm (the foodie side of his and his wife’s horse farm, Capital Warmbloods, where he sells primarily chicken and lamb and some Angus beef. He is currently thinking of dabbling in Waygu. Wouldn’t that be awesome, a local source for Wagyu beef? The lamb and beef are pastured in summer months, fed a no-corn diet, and the chickens ($3.00 per pound)  are free-range. The Winfields have 350 acres just 15 minutes from Ottawa’s downtown core. You can reach Scott at the farm for meat by email. scott@palidia.com.

This Sunday the “kids” (Hannah and her SO Mike) are coming for dinner and Rob thought he’d like to do some beer can chicken. I’m not sure he has ever done one of these with “beer”. One of the more popular chickens he has prepared by this method is a tropical style, actually dreamed up by Hannah when she was a young teen. It involves ground banana chips (this is the only conceivable use for these nasty little hard buttons of banana in my opinion).

I thought this would be a great time to try some of Scott’s chickens. I ordered up two and he will deliver them to me at our hockey game on Thursday. Cost of delivery? For me? I have to give him a free pass in the defensive zone…once. So, I’ll let him get by but I’ll force him to the center where my defense partner Andrew can take him out 😉

Rob’s Approach:
I use this recipe from Michael Smith as a basic guideline for cooking times and technique, but that’s where it ends. We’re making a tropically-inspired bird today. I use a tropical drink, mango juice, instead of beer and add two special ingredients to the BBQ rub: brown sugar (just a bit, because it can burn on the chicken under medium heat) and banana chips. I also use a special beer can chicken apparatus and drip tray I got from a BBQ equipment supplier, because I don’t trust the drumstick tripod integrity of an un-aided chicken perched on a beer can.

It was Hannah’s brainstorm years ago during our first attempt at beer can chicken to grind up some leftover banana chips with a mortar and pestle to add to the spice rub. Combined with the mango juice infused meat, it provides a nice tropical blend of flavours.

For a barbeque sauce, I use a sauce that’s lighter in flavour and sweet (even Diana Sauce for example). If I have it, I’d add a dash of pineapple juice and soy sauce to it. It’s important to wait until the last 15 minutes or so on the grill, to “paint” the chicken with the sauce blend, otherwise the sugars in the sauce will cause it to brown too much.

the chicken captures all of fthe moisture of the liquid from the can, producing a supremely juicy and moist chicken. The skin was candied perfectly.
Served with some of Piggy Market’s own pasta salad and a tropical green salad.