Tag Archives: sausage

Un Petit Goût de Lyon and on to Beaune

We awake to an 8 degree Lyon which promises to rain on us. We are busing into the town center to see a basillica and then into old town to shop. Upon our return to the ship we depart for Beaune on the Saone (rhymes with Rhone) River.

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A note about cruising with Viking and their shore excursion guides. We have now been on several tours this trip and have to give kudos to Viking. Their guides are some of the best we have ever encountered. Each one has been extremely knowledgeable about the town and the history of the area and knowledgeable beyond their talks. As well, each one has implemented their own personal style and delivery. Our guide into Lyon, Christian, is well-traveled and a comedian. It was a highly entertaining morning. Beyond that, we have taken as we said, several of the leisurely tours. In each case the guide was superb at keeping the tour moving but never making the more infirm passengers feel hurried. Lastly, unlike in North American tours, tipping while gladly accepted, is never mentioned, either by the guide or by putting a visible basket up front labeled “Tips”. A euro or two for your driver and a little more for your guide is appreciated and well deserved. Our guides this cruise have truly taken our experience to above and beyond.

On this blustery day, our second last of this trip, we view a good part of the city of Lyon from the shores of the Saone River and the hill above the city upon which the Notre Dame de Fourvière Basilica is perched.  Colourful buildings line the shores of the river and I notice each window is decorated with an ornate iron faux balcony and window valance. Very picturesque. Our bus climbs the hill to the basilica to where we are let out to view the building. Here we are invited into the most ornate building, church or otherwise, I have ever entered. A sight to behold – a wedding cake topped with ice cream and sprinkles then dusted in gold leaf for good measure. A cherry would be gauche.

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After viewing the spectacular interior we head to the the walled cliff just beyond to see the equally spectacular view of the city of Lyon at our feet.

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The bus winds its way down the hillside and deposits us in old town. Our guide, Christian, leads us through traboules, ancient doors in the apartment walls that lead to interior courtyards and serve as shortcuts between the streets. The traboules are distinct to Lyon.

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In the ancient town of narrow cobbled streets we peruse shops and cafes. There are many purveyors of candy – chocolate, calisson and nougat –  specialties of the region, flower shops, soap and gourmet foods such as regional salts, meats and candied fruit.

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We are on the hunt for regional specialties, particularly Lyonaise sausages. We are stymied on many occasions because the French feel Wednesday is a holiday especially preceding a bank holiday which is then followed by a what the hell holiday, because you know…we are, French. So. Not a lot open the past few days. Luckily, we stumble upon a lovely shop here in this narrow alley in Lyon which features an array of homemade sausages: fine herb, blueberry, paprika, boar, chevre, poivre, nature — handmade and rustic. We select several and are dying to get them home to share with friends. Some baguette, french cheese, moutard and a pickle. Happiness.

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Our time, while short but well spent and very enjoyable,  is cut even shorter as the skies open and heavy rain chases us back to the bus and onward to our waiting ship. We are treated to hot chocolate spiked with rum upon boarding, to chase the chill. The Viking staff often have little surprises waiting.

This evening the crew present a farewell dinner to us. The day after tomorrow, most passengers have horrific flight schedules, us included, so tonight will be the night for goodbyes. Dinner, a seven course event, includes regional specialties from the Burgundy region where we are now docked, including escargot, filet mignon and shrimp with bearnaise and duchesse potatoes with red wine jus and crepe Suzette for dessert. Lovely end to a lovely week.

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Tomorrow we have a walking tour of Chalon-sur-Saone and some free time to shop before an early dinner and early up for a brutally early flight.

Plantation Cafe, the Angel Oak & Charleston

Hitting the road for Charleston today. It is a short drive but we are taking a 40 minute detour to see the Angel Oak. We are going to breakfast around the corner at the Plantation Cafe. Full up when we get there, we wait ten minutes and are seated inside. By 10 it is too hot to eat outside.

The cafe menu has plenty of southern classics and some creative breakfast choices. I’m brought a really good cup of coffee and some oj. The chicken fried steak is frozen. Pout. I choose Ellie’s breakfast but substitute country ham for sausage. Our waitress assures me it is the real deal, not processed crap. Rob orders the True Southern Breakfast.

Plates arrive. My breakfast comes with two prefect fried eggs, a delicate, fluffy angel biscuit, three slices of fried green tomatoes, grits and a huge slice of country ham. The grits are unseasoned. This is the second time this trip. I add a pat of butter, salt and pepper and then they are delicious. A light bulb goes off. I ask our waitress if unseasoned grits are how they are served here in the southeast. She said generally yes. People like to doctor them to their own tastes…more butter, less butter, salt no pepper, and maple syrup. The fried green tomatoes are disappointing. No seasoning and no heat. I don’t eat them.

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Country ham is a thing of beauty. Salty. A slice of meat off the haunch. Real meat not processed. We do not get ham like this in Ottawa. If ham is offered for breakfast in a restaurant home, it is processed. The tomatoes are forgotten.

The true southern breakfast came with excellent golden, crispy shredded hashbrowns, 2 eggs, another fluffy angel biscuit, well made pancakes and sausage patties that were absolutely ordinary.

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Time to head north. The short drive brings us by the Marine Corp Air training center, with several fighter jets on display, trailers, open fields, swamps, vegetables like okra, butterbeans are on offer by the roadside, boiled peanut stands, antiques, churches, fireworks and a vineyard. A billboard advertizes The Edisto Beach Shagfest(!). A fireworks store announces “Everything 25 cents and up. Mostly up.” Gas stops stock camo Redbull.

About 15 minutes out of Charleston, we follow a dirt road to the Angel Oak, a live oak tree that may be up to 1500 years old. It is magnificent. The trunk is 8.5 meters in circumference. The branches arch and dip gracefully to the ground and rise up again, growing, reaching. Many of the limbs have supports to manage the enormous weight. The angel oak is something to behold and it is almost impossible to get the entirety of this tree in a single camera frame.

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Before leaving the oak we visit the gift shop and discover an interesting treat. Benne wafers. Africans brought benne seeds with them to America and made them into sweet wafer treats. They taste nutty of sesame, honey and caramel and are nice and crunchy.

We are almost upon Charleston, our destination today and home for two nights. Bags are dropped and we are off to explore. The city is charming and colonial. The waterfront park has children splashing and wading in fountains, cruise ships anchored and boaters enjoying the final weekend of summer.

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It is baking hot. We last a scant forty minutes before finding sustenance at the Blind Tiger. Vodka Gimlets. A seriously refreshing growed-up drink. A small nosh and back to the surface of the sun.

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Dinner tonight will be at The Craftsman Kitchen and Tap House, a short stroll from our hotel.

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Craftsman has 48 taps and an impressive 200-plus bottled beer selection about which our waitress is quite knowledgeable. Rob starts with a Festina Peche, a Berliner Weissbeer from Doghead Fish Brewery in Delaware and I’m having a really excellent Long Day Bohemian Lager from Red Hare Brewing Company in Georgia.

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For dinner,  we decide to split the Crunchy Dame Sandwich, stout braised pork belly, cherry jam, raclette cheese, grainy mustard aioli and a  fried sunny on sweet Hawaiian bread egg. The sandwich is small but rich.

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It’s too hot for a large meal. We order some highly recommended squid fries, beer battered squid with pickled onion, house cured bacon and a lemon aioli.

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Next, we have some some very tasty General Tso’s wings – – 8 wings in a sticky soy garlic sauce with a mild chili bite, served with a cucumber soy pickle.

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The house made pickle plate included squash, green beans, red pepper, more cucumber soy, cauliflower and napa cabbage. The pickles were salty and vinegary. No subtlety. Not a favourite for sure.

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We have a second glass of beer, local Thai white, with Thai spices, that our able waitress has selected for us. Excellent end to satisfying meal.

 

 

 

Diners: Hamie’s

Hamie’s Diner on Beechwood Ave is the third attempt in our series to find great, irony-free diners. Hamie’ s lacks the homemade, family-run charm of our previous finds but makes up for it with simple, classic diner fare and friendly wait staff that make you feel at home immediately. The diner is medium sized, seats about 60, and is pleasantly busy with an audible but not overwhelming din on this sunny Sunday morning in early July. Vinyl booths are smallish but counter stools and a few cafe tables offer alternatives.

Street parking is easy to find this particular morning. We head inside take a window seat. Our fellow diners are clearly locals, not tourists. Hamie’s is a neighbourhood joint. Our waitress, pleasant and efficient, welcomes us and gets us coffee and juice. Juice comes in a bottle. Coffee is thin and not to my liking, but I am hardly a connoisseur. Don’t go by me, I’m a Timmie’s girl.  We peruse the menu of diner breakfast classics for the most part, and I will forgive the gender friendly Lumberjack/Jill selections and Atkin’s specials. We both order the Lumberjack breakfast which includes two pancakes, home fries, toast, bacon, ham or sausage and two eggs. Mine is coming with bacon and white toast, Rob’s with sausage and rye toast. The rye toast is $1.00 extra and jam for the toast is 25 cents. I don’t care about the money but this nickle-and-diming leaves a negative impression. Add 25 cents to to the cost of all your menu items and put jam on the table. After placing our orders I noticed a small sign that said cash only. This belongs on the front door.

Our food arrives very quickly. Eggs are perfect, pancakes are rich and fluffy – this means they have a kickass short order cook back there. Our toast is well- buttered – I forego jam because it annoys me to ask and since the eggs are a perfect over medium I’ll use it to soak up yolk. My bacon is good but could be a little crisper for my taste. Rob’s good quality breakfast links are split open and fried on the flat top which makes them especially tasty. The home fries, pan-fried not deep fried, are very good. No throw away garnishes on the plate which pleases me. On the whole, breakfast was very good and we would return if we were in the area. $26.20 plus tip.

Hamie's Diner on Urbanspoon

 

Chicago: Pizano’s & Popcorn!

When we wrapped our monster road trip last summer in Chicago, we knew we’d have to return. We’re here for the Just For Laughs festival, an extension of the iconic Montreal comedy event, and also to check out some of its iconic eateries and famous food.

Arrived in the windy city just before noon on a pleasantly cool summer day. Our flight was at a civilized 9:50 am, and oddly, there was no one behind us or in front of us at check in, security or immigration AND our bags were the first to come off the carousel on the other side. Quickest airline experience ever. After an uneventful flight, the best kind, we arrived in Chicago and checked in at The Wit Hotel. We were eager to hit the bustling streets and enjoy the city. Conan O’Brien is taping his late night talk show ight next door this week and carrying out his antics on the State Street Bridge which we have a view of from our hotel room on the 24th floor.

We walked snapping pics until we got hungry. We decided on Pizano’s simply because it was in front of us at the moment of need. It was well after 1 pm and the place was hopping inside and out. We opt for a seat inside. It is rather cool outside and street traffic is heavy. Turns out to be a good choice and we have a great view of the street from our table.

The restaurant is decorated in “amateur Italian mural” and the walls are adorned from the bottom up with framed sports figure photos and local celebs. Baseball and football have a huge presence.  The Blackhawks have disturbingly little love from what I can see on this my second visit to the city. They won a cup in very recent memory. What have the Cubs done? I digress.

Our friendly waitress starts to rhyme off what she has on tap. We stop her at Blue Moon. Two refreshing glasses of this delicious wheat beer that is unavailable north of the border. Our beers come and she answers our menu questions. I order the Italian sausage sandwich which is her personal favorite and a big seller. Rob is determined apparently to find out what all the fuss is about Italian beef, a Chicago special. We had it on our last visit and declared it to be ….well….awful. He believes we had a bad one and are missing out on something. Our waitress agrees with him and says their Italian beef is excellent. Turns out they were both right.

We have time to finish our beers before our food arrives. This is a good sign. They are making stuff fresh in the kitchen. Our plates come heaping with excellent fries, crispy, skin on, perfect. A very good vinegar coleslaw and a decent dill accompany both sandwiches. Mine comes with a small cup of very good meat sauce and Rob’s comes with au jus dip and and a sport- and cherry-pepper-laced gardinere.

My Italian sausage is juicy but a tad salty. The bun is perfectly toasty, warm and chewy but not tough. A little cheese and an excellent tomato sauce makes this a great choice. Rob gives me a bite of his Italian beef and I have to admit…he was right. We just had a bad one on our first try. This is beefy, tasty and spicy hot with piles juicy beef, sweet peppers and a generous application of hot Italian gardienere. The bun is as mine was, toasty and nicely chewy. The sandwich was not pre-dipped and therefore not a soggy mess, which some Chicago native’s find a plus. It comes down to personal taste and this was more to our taste.

On our walk back to our hotel we stopped in at Garrett Popcorn to buy some of their famous Chicago Mix popcorn. Lucky for us there were no lineups today. Sometimes they go down the street. Garrets famous blend is completely addictive and made fresh without preservatives every day.

Pizano's Pizza & Pasta on Urbanspoon

 

The Chicago Blend is a delicious blend of cheesy and caramel popcorn. The caramel coating the kernels tastes lightly of burnt sugar and the heavily cheesy corn of cheetos. OMG delicious. BEST. POPCORN. EVER. I cannot stop eating it and my fingers are permanently stained orange.


Garrett Popcorn Shops on Urbanspoon

Piggy Market 2.0!

The new and even better Piggy Market re-opened November 12th as an artisan delicatessen and craft butcher shop. I dropped in this week for a quick chat with Dave Neil, co-owner of Piggy. He explained that craft butcher is an Irish designation for meat that is hung to age not cryovaced. The new butchery offers custom cutting of local beef (O’Brien Farms) and Ontario pork as well as heritage pork – Large Black, Berkshire, and Tamworth, which they rotate on a weekly basis. This means you can visit Piggy and have your beef ground while you wait (they take orders ahead of time on the phone as well), and have your steaks cut to your desired thickness. If you are interested in stocking your freezer and want a more hands on approach you can order a 1/2 pig, whole lamb or prime cut of beef, and they will butcher it to your specifications after hours while you watch. You also have the option to sign a waiver and do some of the cutting yourself.

Piggy is also committed to featuring the best charcuterie available locally. Currently they are carrying an array of wonderful treats such as lardo, cutatello, rosetta and salame from Dolce Lucano of Woodbridge, Ontario (exclusive) and smoked molasses and cracked black pepper bacon (!) and dried sausage from Seed to Sausage in the Charbot Lake area. This is probably the best charcuterie Rob and I have come across in our travels and Piggy brings it to us right here in Ottawa. Check out Piggy’s website and blog for weekly offerings, or just pop in and be inspired like we do.

For the upcoming holiday season, Piggy Market helps you get into a festive mood with offerings like goose, duck, suckling pig, turkey (local and local organic), tortiere and plum puddings, beef suet for mince meat and for your feathered friends, and high fat butter from Stirling, Ontario for your baking. They also offer prepared charcutierie platters on slate boards for your entertaining needs.

Piggy continues to carry all your favorites: a selection of Ontario and Quebec cheeses, local eggs and dairy, Art-Is-In bread, Jamaican patties, Bryson Farms products, local produce, Pascal’s ice cream, Piggy’s own to die for 4-cheese mac and cheese and more.

On our first visit to the new re-opened Piggy Market, we were inspired by a beautiful flank steak and changed our dinner plans. We marinated it, grilled it, sliced it and served it with grilled red peppers and onions, a cilantro relish and some hot sauce. We’ll cover the meal in more detail for a future posting, but here’s a delicious preview.